The Palette

Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

Jacob Kaplan, Co-Editor in Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The United States of America, as the most powerful global hegemony on the planet today, and possibly in the world’s history, has seemed to come to a grinding stop. Or at least the federal government has. Our nation, which was founded by immigrants, has never been one to solve issues in the most efficient of fashions and yet that is the reason that distinguishes us from the rest of the world. That is not to say that other countries do not have democracies that disagree, because that is completely and utterly untrue, but rather most countries do not come to a draw and shut down when their collective branches of government can no longer agree.

The massive machine of the federal government has seemed to come to a grinding halt over a variety of issues, especially one that is near and dear to many hearts: DACA, or the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Signed in June of 2012, DACA was a program initiated by the Obama Administration that allowed 800,000 immigrants, both legal and illegal, to receive a two-year period of deferred action from deportation that was renewable and the opportunity to gain a work visa. In a study of August of 2012 by the Pew Research Center, a think tank, there was an estimated 1.7 million people eligible for the program’s enrollment. The history of DACA is extraordinarily touchy and controversial for many people, especially when it hits home for them. In November of 2014, President Obama pushed for the expansion of DACA and after many cases of state-federal government suing, it was finally pushed through where it was rescinded only three years later in June of 2017 by the United States Department of Defense.  

The issue with DACA is that the Trump Administration and many Conservative Republicans no longer would like DACA to be an American program while many democrats in the Senate continue to support it even after the Obama Administration’s end of office term. President Trump decided on September 5, 2017, DACA would be rescinded, but it was delayed for a 6-month period to give Congress enough time to decide how they would address the issue of the immigrants who were previously eligible under DACA. That is how we have arrived here. President Trump, although with a majority of fifty-one Republicans in the Senate, needed sixty to pass the rescindition and on this past Thursday, the bill was still unagreed upon. With a stalemate in the Senate, Congress is faced with a problem. The federal fiscal year, the year when the federal government organizes its financial records, begins on October 1st but is usually extended by many short-term agreements between Congress and the President. If the fate of DACA is not agreed upon, the government, faced with its federal fiscal year, must shut down as to not waste nonessential federal programs and therefore tax dollars.

This government has shut down many times in the past and for many different reasons and time periods, and this really is no different. Although the causes of the DACA disagreement are many and still debated, the main reason is most likely that there are still democrats in both of the houses of the Congress, meaning that if President Trump wants to repeal any of the Obama Administration’s laws, he will have an extremely difficult time with many of Obama’s previous supporters placed against him. DACA was one of the Obama Administration’s most controversial bills, with democrats tending to like the bill as it extended immigrants’ rights while displaying no real increase in crime rates and a more integrated role in society for the people who utilized DACA. Trump has been attempting to disassemble DACA since the beginning of his taking of office and it was one of his highly valued and promised ideas on his campaign, meaning that he is willing to fight to the end for DACA, whether it goes in his direction or not, while the democrats are full heartedly and stubbornly, I might add, holding their ground. But that might change. In the past few days, President Trump has added a new compromise between the two parties with the intentions of ending the shutdown where DACA is extended to 2 million illegal immigrants, but 25 Billion dollars will be funded by Congress towards border protection and Trump’s possible wall.

We are yet to see what will come of it all, but in my opinion, I believe that DACA is a double-edged sword. It is a program with good intentions and consequences, but it displays the wrong message about immigrants and about earning citizenship. The DACA program itself is quite ingenious as it tries to compromise between the republicans and democrats, giving each side a benefit to DACA as pre-existing immigrants gained deferred action to deportation, that was renewable each two years, while having an age and occupation limit for the people who did apply. The problem, though, with DACA comes from the image that it portrays about the United States’ government and its take on immigration. It is obvious to see that we as a nation were founded by immigrants, but it is simply unreasonable to ask unlimited immigration or no immigration at all. The U.S. Border Patrol and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or I.C.E., try their hardest to maintain the laws put in place by Washington, but by showing immigrants that they can illegally cross over into the U.S. before they, or even their kids are sixteen, it shows that we bend to the will of immigrants because they are breaking through our borders and coming inside our country. DACA is a program that gives aid and deferred action to deportation to those who came here, both legally and illegally, and the opportunity to gain a work visa, but in the end it does has its flaws and all we can hope is that it is only the beginning.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deferred_Action_for_Childhood_Arrivals#Impact

http://www.cnn.com/2018/01/19/politics/cnn-poll-shutdown-trump-immigration-daca/index.html

https://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/consideration-deferred-action-childhood-arrivals-daca

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/oped-protecting-dream-daca-fight-over-america-s-soul-n798986

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/us/politics/timeline-daca-shutdown-trump.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/us/politics/senate-showdown-government-shutdown-trump.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiscal_year

https://www.thebalance.com/government-shutdown-3305683

 

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    Support Kids For All

  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    The Gallery is here!

  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    How your internet rights are not actually guaranteed…

  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    Broadway comes to San Diego

  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    Parking availability

  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    An interview with our Head of Upper School, Dr. Joseph Cox

  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    Getting geared up for school (and curing post-summer blues)

  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    Bees dying at alarming rate

  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    Senior prank

  • Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened

    News

    Inauguration trip: a collection

The student news site of La Jolla Country Day School in La Jolla, California
Government shutdown: How no one wanted it and yet it happened